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As we are in the thick of the holiday season, our clients are busy, we’re busy doing work for them, we’re busy with social events and travel and family functions. Over the next couple of weeks, things will start to slow down and as is natural every year, the New Year will come and it will be a time for reflection and goal setting. I was fortunate to have a 5-6 hour flight to and from Hawaii last week without wifi and one of the things I did during that time was make a list of some of the things I want to accomplish in 2018. Some of them are destinations, some of them are means and slight tweaks to my way of life.

One of the things that always comes up in conversations between Brian and I is being conscious about how much time we have for ourselves together and for ourselves individually. We consciously try to “slow down” and take time to celebrate, have fun and relax.
I was speaking with my business coach yesterday and telling her about this and she asked me how I feel about that in my gut. It’s funny because my brain says “Lacie, you should really slow down. Maybe you shouldn’t have something scheduled at every minute of every day.” Side note, it’s not really THAT bad. But I’m a busy person, sometimes I commit to too much and my general attitude is that life is short and I want to live it to the fullest. All. The. Time.
So, my response to Max was that in my gut, I don’t really want to slow down. I secretly (and not so secretly now) love how busy my life is. I very seldom feel out of control or stressed out by it. I do take time (and I feel like a good amount of it) to be with the ones I love the most. I take time for myself. Brian and I go out quite a bit together. Every once in awhile the world tells me to stop and chill out and I have to listen to that. So mostly, my goal is to prevent the world from getting to that point with me.
This brings me to something I read about awhile ago in The Big Leap, Einstein Time. You can read all the details about Einstein Time in this summary from Hendricks. Essentially, we have a construct in our minds that time is a thing that is given to us, which we must work within and we do not have any control over it. This construct manifests within us as stress, when we feel like we “don’t have enough time” to get things done. We have a social habit of blaming things on time, rather than taking responsibility for time.
The solution to this nagging problem for so many of us is to change our perspective and remove that construct. If we believe we are the creators of time and that we choose how we spend our time, that will free us from the stress of it. Secondly, it’s our responsibility to mentally focus on the event we are presently participating in. Doing so ultimately allows us to feel as if time is slowing down and we become hyper-productive, both in a work setting and in a personal setting. If we can stop thinking about the next thing we have to do and focus on the thing we are currently doing, we begin to control time. One of the most tactical ways Hendrick’s recommends controlling time is to change the way we talk about time. Rather than saying “I don’t have time for,” we can say “I haven’t prioritized this,” or “I haven’t made time for this quite yet.”
It’s a little bit of an abstract theory and I think this video does a nice job explaining it. For further information, refer to his book as well.
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